10 Ways To Protect Your Home While On Vacation

Keep your home from being a target with these easy tips.

The season of long weekends and beach getaways is upon us, and the last thing any homeowner wants to imagine when they’re soaking in the sun or taking a dip at the lake is a burglar snooping around their empty home. While there is no use in being paranoid about your belongings while you’re away, home security shouldn’t be taken lightly. And it’s the right season to be wary: The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics has found that household burglary rates are highest in the summer.

So whether you’re getting away for the day or weekend or taking an extended vacation, put these 10 summer holiday safety tips to work and make your home less of a target for robbers this season — or any season.

1. Beef up security systems

Sure, you’ve set the alarm and have motion-activated lights outside, but there are some additional things you should consider doing to protect your home. For instance, install a heavy-duty lock strike plate on your door; it’s the weakest part and where thieves may try to break in. You can also add sash pins to double-hung windows to make them more secure.

2. Make your home look lived in

One big clue to burglars that you’ve gone away during the summer? An unkempt lawn. Be sure to mow it before you leave — or hire someone to keep it trimmed while you’re gone — so your home looks well cared for. The same precaution can be transferred to winter months — if you’re expecting a big snow, have someone on retainer to shovel your walk and driveway.

3. Don’t keep your windows open

String lights can be a great way to illuminate a deck or outdoor space during summer months, but don’t run electrical extension cords through your windows. If your windows don’t close and latch, you’re sending burglars an invitation to invade.

4. Don’t fall for door-to-door solicitations

A common way to scope out what kind of goodies you have in your home is by posing as a charity asking for donations. If someone comes to your door, don’t open it, or ask for an ID that links them to the charity — and don’t let them see inside.

5. Use the latest tech

Take advantage of a devices like FakeTV, which mimics the flickering light of a TV to make it look as though you are home. Other home automation devices, like Wi-Fi-enabled security systems or plug-in devices that allow you to turn lights on and off remotely with your cellphone, can also help ward off thieves.

6. Keep your valuables out of sight

That shiny new laptop, your favorite jewelry, or basically anything valuable you’ve forgotten to stash out of sight could tempt burglars. Before you head out of town, do a quick walk-through in each room and hide all valuables.

7. Make a record of valuables

It’s a good idea to take pictures of your stuff — particularly big-ticket items such as laptops and TVs — and keep serial numbers in a safe place. Should the worst happen, you’ll have a record of what was taken and be able to confirm your things are truly yours if they are recovered by police.

8. Do your packing out of sight

Sure, you have to make room for the bikes, load up the boogie boards, and stash away some snacks, but be smart about where you pack up the car. If possible, keep your car in the garage or out of sight, advises Heather Dodson, a real estate agent at Team Leung in Greensboro, NC.

9. Be smart about boxes

If you’ve bought new gear to bring along on your summer vacation, don’t leave the empty boxes on the curb for everyone to see. Instead, break down the cardboard and put it in your container for recycling or trash pickup.

10. Don’t publicize your vacation plans

It’s hard to fight the allure of Facebook and Instagram. But it’s probably not the best idea to share your travel plans online with your 500 closest friends. Your Facebook profile might not be as private as you think — and it’s better not to take the risk.

Source: trulia.com ~ By: Ginny Gaylor

2017 vs. 2018: What’s Different About Buying Real Estate This Year?

When you’re ready to buy a home, it’s important to take every factor into consideration. Changes in the market from year to year can have a major impact on how you purchase a home. Keep these things in mind while looking for a new home:

Millennials Are Taking Over

Even though millennials aren’t the biggest category of homeowners right now, they’re expected to be by the end of 2018. For the first time, they’ll be the majority homeowners. The fact that they’re buying more homes means there are different selling and purchase patterns coming up in the future due to the different spending habits of millennials.

Home Prices Are Going Up

Those who sell real estate see an increase in the prices of homes. In most areas, the median price is rising—an increase that may be due to greater demand from first-time homebuyers. The good news? Rising house prices is an indicator that the economy is on the rise.

Number of Sales Is Going Up

More people are buying homes now than ever before. The average number of sales real estate agents see is increasing. And, since more people are buying homes, the demand will continue increasing. It’s important for those who want to purchase a home to get in on the action now before prices go up even more in the future.

Ownership Is Stabilizing

For years, there was a lot of fluctuation in homeownership. However, for the first time ever, the homeownership rate is stabilizing. And the demand will continue increasing so people can see all the different options they have for purchasing a home no matter what area they’re in.

Anyone looking for a home should consider market conditions, the things that are happening with homes and the availability of homes in their area. Always consider where and when you’re buying a home!

Source: blog.rismedia.com ~ By: Hannah Whittenly

A Home Buyer’s Guide to Motivated Sellers

Home shoppers outnumber home sellers in many places. If you’re a home buyer, you need every competitive advantage you can get. That’s why it pays to know how to find motivated sellers and persuade them to choose you.

The definition of “motivated seller” has changed since the depths of the economic crisis about a decade ago, when many motivated sellers were trying to avoid foreclosure. There are fewer of these desperate sellers now, but you can still find motivated sellers if you know where to look.

What is a motivated seller?

“A motivated seller is someone that needs to move out quickly,” explains Sonia Figueroa. Figueroa, a real estate agent with Century 21 Affiliated in Chicago, lists common motivators:

  • The home has been on the market for three months or more, and the sellers feel impatient
  •  The sellers are relocating for a job
  •  The sellers are divorcing. “They’re super motivated because they want to get rid of each other, get rid of their assets and be done,” Figueroa says.
  •  The owner died and the sellers are the heirs. “They just want to price it to sell it, to divvy up the money,” Figueroa says.

Identifying a motivated seller

Here are telltale signs that the seller is motivated: The home is priced to sell quickly, it has been fixed up and staged, and the listing photos were taken by a professional photographer, says Stacy Hennessey, a real estate agent with McEnearney Associates in Falls Church, Virginia.

Another sign is when the seller is willing to negotiate. That’s not the norm in a typical seller’s market, where “if you don’t come with a full-price offer or a near full-price offer with terms that the seller likes, they can say, ‘Thank you, but no. Next!’” says Terri Robinson, a real estate agent with Re/Max Select Properties in Ashburn, Virginia. A motivated seller will make a counteroffer, even to a lowball bid.

And sometimes a home’s listing contains the phrase “motivated seller,” or the seller’s agent says the seller is motivated.

Tips for buying from a motivated seller

Ask what the seller’s priorities are. “The question becomes what are their hot buttons? What are their needs?” Robinson says. Maybe the sellers need a place to live while renovation work on their new house is wrapped up. Or maybe the sellers want certainty that the buyer can qualify for a mortgage.

Offer to solve the seller’s problem. “From the very beginning, having your agent tell the listing agent that you will be flexible and you want to help them out” can give you the competitive edge, Hennessey says.

Get preapproved for a mortgage. With a mortgage preapproval, you can close faster and the seller is assured that the deal won’t fall apart because of problems getting financing.

Offer flexibility on the closing date. Your offer is more competitive if you can adjust your timing to the seller’s timing, Hennessey says. One seller might want to close as quickly as possible, and another might want to wait until the end of the school year.

Offer a larger-than-usual earnest money deposit. Offering more than your area’s customary deposit is a signal that you’re serious. “My sellers always ask me what the deposit is,” says Creig Northrop, president and CEO of Northrop Realty in Clarksville, Maryland. A 1% deposit is standard in Northrop’s market. More than that is “showing sincere interest. So if you can get in the 2% to 5% range of deposits, you’re in really good shape,” he says.

Pay your closing costs instead of asking the seller to pay. Depending on where you are, it might be customary for the seller to pay certain closing costs. Offer to pay them yourself.

Offer to rent the house to the seller for a limited time. Sometimes sellers want to close the sale of their home a few days or weeks before moving into their next home. You can offer to let the seller rent the home for a few days or weeks. Customarily, buyers charge a daily rate of the mortgage payment divided by the number of days in the month. Your offer will stand out if you don’t charge rent.

Source: nerdwallet.com ~ BY: HOLDEN LEWIS

9 Home Improvements That Can Help (and Hurt) Value

Home improvement can be taken as very demanding action, but there are also some ways of home improvement you can do yourself. Therefore, before you start with any, see what improvements are the most needed in your home. Nowadays, a big attraction is an energy-efficient home which saves a lot of energy and reduces energy costs. On the other hand, maintenance problems and pest or bug infestations are a major turn off and should be looked into ASAP.

We bring you several great pieces of advice you can use to improve your home’s value and feel more comfortable and cozy.

1. Water Filtration System

A water filtration system in your kitchen is a small addition that will appeal to many home buyers and is used for purifying the water. When you have a water filtration system installed in your house, you don’t have to buy bottled water anymore. The best thing is that it’s not expensive at all, and everyone can afford it.

2. Removing Old Carpets

Besides looking old, old carpets might also be hiding contaminants and allergens which means you have bad air quality in your home. Sometimes the best option for testing an indoor air quality is to call a professional company because they will surely do a great job.

Wooden floors are an excellent way to bring the touch of outdoors in your home. Great examples of environmentally friendly natural products are tile or laminated floors. By replacing your old carpets with a hard surface floor, your house will be easier to clean, and you’ll have more time to do things you like.

3. Replacing Popcorn Ceiling

It is no secret that homes with popcorn ceilings are outdated so get rid of this popcorn ceiling fast. To be sure that it does not contain asbestos, it would be best to hire professionals to test it. Replacing Popcorn Ceiling is as simple as buying a solution to soften the texture from the hardware store and scraping the popcorn away.

4. Bathroom Remodeling

Remodeling bathrooms is a great way to add more value to your home. If a full rebuild is not in your budget, you can invest in many small changes that will freshen up your bathroom. Replace the dated wallpaper, old lighting, add some fancy cupboard knobs or change the faucet and shower heads.

5. Kitchen Remodeling

Just like the bathroom, a big kitchen update can do wonders. Stained sinks and old appliances are all things to look at. If replacing the kitchen cabinets is too much for you, you can always give them a new look by adding a new varnish or paint layer and swap those old doorknobs with modern ones.

6. Maintenance and Repairs

Maintenance is an ongoing process, no matter if you plan to live in your house for a long time or move soon. Repairing or replacing broken appliances or fixtures will avoid further damage. Certain things are not to be left, and for example, leak spots on the ceiling can cause great damage to your roof if not taken care of immediately. If your home is up for sale, a sign of poor maintenance will make the home seekers wonder what else is wrong with the house.

7. Water Heater Upgrade

An old water heater can be a turn off for some home buyers, but you can find water heaters that come with a tankless model. This kind of water heaters are more efficient as they only heat up the water that you need.

8. Appliance Updates

Nowadays, energy-efficiency is becoming trendy. Appliances with an energy star label use 10 to 50 percent less energy and water than other conventional appliances. New models look great, and many are stainless steel which is a bonus. If you do not have the money for buying modern devices, upgrade the lighting to energy star.

9. Update Fixtures

Fixtures in your home include curtain rods, light fixtures, doorknobs, switch plates, outlet covers, etc. Make sure that these are updated because sometimes it’s the small detail that counts. For example, outlet covers and switch plates look more attractive when made of metal. These changes are easy to do yourself and aren’t so expensive, just be sure you choose the right color which looks great combined with other furniture in your home.

Source: realtytimes.com ~ By: Matt James

Why Real Estate May Be A Big Winner In The Tax Cuts And Jobs Act

On the surface it may look like the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is bad for real estate. The reduction in the deductibility of mortgage interest and the combined $10,000 cap on state and local tax (SALT) deductions for income, sales and property, along with the elimination of moving expense deductions would make a compelling argument. But after digging through the fine print, the outcome is that real estate may actually be the big winner.

The mortgage deduction has been reduced to $750,000 dollars for new homeowners, but the deductibility of current mortgage debt up to $1 million is still protected. The only change was that technically under the old law one could also deduct $100,000 of home-equity debt. This is no longer allowed unless an equity loan is used to substantially improve the residence.

However, let’s keep in mind that these mortgage provisions are due to sunset on Dec. 31, 2025. So, don’t run out and pay down your mortgage because you won’t be able to get the deductions back. These limits are short-lived.

Let’s delve a little deeper. How did real estate come out alright?

  • The deduction for mortgage interest on second homes survived although it initially appeared to be on the chopping block.
  • The ability to rent a primary or secondary home for up to 14 days a year and not pay taxes on the income survived.
  • A new deduction for pass-through entities benefits real estate, particularly real estate investment trusts. This will enable real estate partnerships and LLCs to get a new 20% deduction.
  • Real estate agents–unlike doctors, lawyers, financial planners and professional athletes–are not considered a service industry profession and therefore are exempt from the limit in their pass-through deductions if their income is higher than $207,500 or $415,000 for a couple.
  • Real estate professionals who work more than 750 hours a year can still deduct their real estate losses from ordinary income and lower income investors can still deduct passive income, such as real estate rentals.
  • The bill doubles the Section 179 deduction for qualifying expenses, allowing business to annually deduct up to $1 million on certain types of property expenses.
  • Land and property depreciation has been retained and the alternative depreciation system period for residential property has been shortened. This is a huge win for the industry because one of the key features to investing in real estate is depreciation because under U.S. accounting rules real estate loses value, even though it tends to rise in market value.
  • Changes in the carried interest deduction–one must now hold assets for three years instead of only one–will benefit real estate funds substantially more than other types of managed funds.
  • And finally, the lucrative 1031 tax free exchange rules that were on the initial chopping block were retained. Section 1031 allows real estate investors to defer capital gains taxes if they are using the money to purchase another property.

These are just a few of the benefits that real estate has received and only scratches the surface of the plethora of real estate strategies that continue to survive. Not only should commercial real estate benefit, but residential real estate still maintains its luster.

In the end, real estate may be the big winner but so is capitalism. After all, real estate is one of the foundations of an ownership society. As my favorite economist Hernando De Soto said in his book, The Mystery of Capital, “Real estate is why capitalism triumphs in the west and fails everywhere else.”

Source: Forbes.com  ~ BY: John E. Girouard

Get Your Home Summer Ready Now Before It Gets Scorching

Advice for spring home buyers can be found in this recently released survey from realtor.com® , a leading online real estate destination. Research highlights the reality of today’s home buying markets around the country. Advice and insights into one of the most competitive home buying markets in years can help buyers and let sellers know what to expect. Chief Economist at realtor.com Danielle Hale tells the story behind the numbers.

This year there is even less inventory than last year. According to our February 2018 data inventory is down 8.5% from last February. Days on Market (DOM) fell to 85 nationally from 90 last year.

The big news that impacts buyers according to Hale, inventory has declined for 42 consecutive months. What’s most interesting and what the research showed is buyers are getting the message that it is a tougher market this Spring. Either they have heard, or they have experienced it personally as they made offers and did not get the property, Hale adds.

Listen to Hale’s advice for buyers. You have to know exactly what your comfort zone is and the maximum price you can pay. It’s very important to be thinking about what you can afford as mortgage rates go higher especially if they move up quickly.

Take a look at the research from Toluna who in early March surveyed more than 1,000 active buyers. Clearly buyers are out there armed with as much market knowledge as possible. Many are more determined than before to strike a deal.

Here’s key research from the survey. The message is buyers are serious this Spring with 40 percent of buyers planning to put more than 20 percent down in hopes of getting ahead of the competition. Almost half (40%) of today’s buyers have been actively looking for a home for more than seven months. Many remain hopeful with 60 percent thinking they will close on a home within the next six months. Strategies to nab that dream home include checking listing websites daily, while 40 percent of buyers plan to put more than 20 percent cash down. More than a third are setting price alerts on properties. More than 25 percent will offer above asking price with  31 percent planning to put a larger earnest money deposit down.  Only 6 percent indicated they are not planning to use any tactics to cope with competition.

Boston’s David Bates, a long-time Broker Associate at William Ravis Real Estate sums it up.

“We have had a lot of strong markets, but this probably is the strongest I have seen. In my office, folks are talking about the significant competition for modestly priced properties outside the city, say around $500,000 or less. Someone had a 28-offer situation in Chelmsford, another had a 17-offer situation in Everett. I myself had a nine offer and six offer situations in Beverly. These are not the most sought-after communities in Greater Boston. Perhaps there are a number of things motivating buyers, but high on the list is the lack of affordability in and close to the city.”

If you plan on house hunting this Spring, good luck. If you plan to sell this Spring, chances are your home will sell quickly and possibly for above asking price if it’s priced right, in excellent condition and has location, location, location going for it.

Source: forbes.com ~ By: Ellen Paris, Contributor

Advice For Spring Home Buyers: Be Prepared For Lots Of Competition

Advice for spring home buyers can be found in this recently released survey from realtor.com® , a leading online real estate destination. Research highlights the reality of today’s home buying markets around the country. Advice and insights into one of the most competitive home buying markets in years can help buyers and let sellers know what to expect. Chief Economist at realtor.com Danielle Hale tells the story behind the numbers.

This year there is even less inventory than last year. According to our February 2018 data inventory is down 8.5% from last February. Days on Market (DOM) fell to 85 nationally from 90 last year.

The big news that impacts buyers according to Hale, inventory has declined for 42 consecutive months. What’s most interesting and what the research showed is buyers are getting the message that it is a tougher market this Spring. Either they have heard, or they have experienced it personally as they made offers and did not get the property, Hale adds.

Listen to Hale’s advice for buyers. You have to know exactly what your comfort zone is and the maximum price you can pay. It’s very important to be thinking about what you can afford as mortgage rates go higher especially if they move up quickly.

Take a look at the research from Toluna who in early March surveyed more than 1,000 active buyers. Clearly buyers are out there armed with as much market knowledge as possible. Many are more determined than before to strike a deal.

Here’s key research from the survey. The message is buyers are serious this Spring with 40 percent of buyers planning to put more than 20 percent down in hopes of getting ahead of the competition. Almost half (40%) of today’s buyers have been actively looking for a home for more than seven months. Many remain hopeful with 60 percent thinking they will close on a home within the next six months. Strategies to nab that dream home include checking listing websites daily, while 40 percent of buyers plan to put more than 20 percent cash down. More than a third are setting price alerts on properties. More than 25 percent will offer above asking price with  31 percent planning to put a larger earnest money deposit down.  Only 6 percent indicated they are not planning to use any tactics to cope with competition.

Boston’s David Bates, a long-time Broker Associate at William Ravis Real Estate sums it up.

“We have had a lot of strong markets, but this probably is the strongest I have seen. In my office, folks are talking about the significant competition for modestly priced properties outside the city, say around $500,000 or less. Someone had a 28-offer situation in Chelmsford, another had a 17-offer situation in Everett. I myself had a nine offer and six offer situations in Beverly. These are not the most sought-after communities in Greater Boston. Perhaps there are a number of things motivating buyers, but high on the list is the lack of affordability in and close to the city.”

If you plan on house hunting this Spring, good luck. If you plan to sell this Spring, chances are your home will sell quickly and possibly for above asking price if it’s priced right, in excellent condition and has location, location, location going for it.

Source: forbes.com ~ By: Ellen Paris, Contributor

Jump Start Your Organizing And Simplify Your Next Move

When you’re selling your home, getting your belongings organized can seem like a low priority. You’re dealing with finding the right real estate agent, the best time to list your home on the market, and maybe even house-hunting for a new place to live.

All of that can keep you quite busy considering many of us have to do those things while we work a full-time job. Organizing your home so that you can simplify your move just doesn’t seem practical.

However, there is one main reason why getting organized can not only simplify your next move but also help improve your chances of selling your home faster and for more money.

When you go through the process of getting organized, you should be eliminating items from your home which helps to clear clutter. Clearing clutter is one of the first things agents and experts who stage homes for sale will tell you to do.

When the clutter is gone, the home can be shown much easier. Potential buyers can see what makes your house so special and different from others in the neighborhood.

If you’re putting off the process of getting organized because you think you should wait until you accept an offer, let me encourage you to get motivated to do it sooner. I’ve seen it happen many times. The homeowner thinks there’s plenty of time and then when an offer is accepted they’re thrust into high gear because the buyer wants to close escrow fast.

Of course, your agent can negotiate the closing date but sometimes a faster closing is a must. Yes, you may be able to rent back from the new owners to give you more time to prepare to move but you can’t avoid the fact that you’ll need to move at some point.

Here are five tips that can help you jump start your organizing and simplify your next move. You will be glad you start before you get an offer to purchase your home.

1. Sort piles of belongings into groups: keep, giveaway, maybe, and trash. The “maybe” pile you box up and seal for six to 12 months. If you don’t have a use for your items in the “maybe” box during the year then perhaps you can donate it.

2. Give yourself plenty of time. Be patient this process of getting organized takes time. Know that when it comes to sorting through personal papers and memorabilia it will take you much longer than reviewing other items. Leave some extra time for the expected reminiscing that will occur.

3. Store your items in clear plastic bins. Using clear boxes helps to let you have a quick view of what’s inside. If you used cardboard boxes or colored bins, then use a pen to clearly label what’s inside and which room it will go in at your new home. You might want to use a large piece of paper to write the label on so that you can reuse the bin again later for another purpose.

4. Get rid of the paper. A big problem in many homes is the paper trail they have from room to room. It could be magazines, newspapers, documents, advertisements, receipts, you name it. Most homeowners keep a lot of paper which creates a lot of clutter. Go through your files and reduce the paper by shredding or recycling documents you don’t need. You’ll find that a lot of what you’re hanging on to, you just don’t need.

5. Do it now! This is the most valuable tip. As soon as you finish reading this, go put a time on your calendar when you will begin to get organized. Placing it on your calendar should help you block off time to get started and prevent procrastination. If you take care of things right away, you’ll find that life gets simpler. The same goes for your move. So, get organized and simplify your next move!

Source: RealtyTimes.com

Terms Every Homebuyer Should Understand

If you’re buying a home, you’ll more than likely be obtaining a mortgage, which you may not know much about. In fact, unless you’ve been involved in a home sale before, there are many things you will be learning about for the first time.

Here is a handy list of some of the key terms that every person involved in a real estate transaction should understand.

Appraisal: The written analysis of the estimated value of a property, as prepared by a qualified appraiser, which often determines if you will qualify for the loan.

Closing: One of the last steps of any sale. This is the meeting where the lender, buyer and seller complete the sale and mortgage process. Once the home closes, the home officially belongs to the new buyer.

Closing costs: This term refers to the money paid at closing to the lender and consists of a loan origination fee, points, appraisal fee, title search and insurance, survey, taxes, deed recording fee, credit report charge and other costs assessed at settlement. Closing costs usually average between 2 – 6 percent of the total mortgage amount.

Credit report: Simply a report of your credit history that a lender will use to determine if you are a good risk for a loan.

Interest-only mortgage: A loan whereby you only pay the interest portion of the mortgage payment each month.

Interest rate: The annual interest on a loan. The lower your interest rate, the lower your monthly payment will be.

Lock-in: The lender’s guarantee that you will be granted a certain interest rate for a specific time period, such as 30 days before closing.

Origination fee: The fee charged by a lender for processing a loan.

Points: The amount that can be paid to a lender to lower the interest rate on your loan at closing. Each point is equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.

Private mortgage insurance (PMI): For those buyers who put less than 20 percent down on a home, lenders will require you to take out PMI, which is then added to your monthly mortgage payment. This protects the lender in the event that you default on the loan.

Title: The home document that proves ownership of the property.

Source: rismedia.com

Get Ready to Buy This Spring

Once you decide that this Spring you want to buy a new home — or your first house — the question is, “Where do we start?”

The answer lies in two sets of decisions:

#1. Start With Success: Begin by deciding what success means to you. Clarify what you really want and why, not just what’s “in” right now. Explore this practical side before viewing properties. What matters is not the number of homes you see, but zeroing in on genuine good matches. For instance, a couple who wanted to add a mortgage-paying basement suite to their next home, decided to search for houses with an existing basement bathroom since this would be the most expensive part of creating a rental unit.

#2. Who’s “We”?: The other essential to a good start is to decide who “we” is going to be:

  • Will friends or family come along to share their construction or real estate ownership expertise?
  • Will you have a contractor on-call to provide renovation-cost estimates to back up your offer price?
  • Who will you select as your local real estate professional to be sure you see all the best matches without being dragged through definite “nos.” For instance, a condominium specialist may not be the best match if you are intent on a detached house with rental suite potential. How much do you need to learn about real estate before you will be comfortable when it’s time to sign on the dotted line? If you have a steep learning curve, you’ll benefit from a real estate profession who is well equipped to inform as well as provide access to the best-fit real estate. Then there’s the professional negotiation skills you’ll want to tap into.

If you want to buy this Spring, when should you start?: How quickly you can find a home to buy and move into it depends on many factors:

  • The transition from searching for an ideal property to moving in can be condensed into a few weeks. This is often the pace for corporate relocation. Frenzied decision-making may not generate the best long-term results unless you are ultra-prepared and an experienced real estate buyer.
  • At the other extreme, stretching the search for that “perfect forever home” over many seasons or even years may work for those who want a specific location or type of property and are not displeased enough with their current home to accelerate the process.

Somewhere in between those extremes lies your ideal time line:

  • Buying within a market cycle, enables your real estate professional to identify specific properties that present the best return in that buyers’, sellers’, or flat market.
  • If you have a busy work and personal life, carving out time to consider listings, view properties, explore neighborhoods, investigate financing, and deal with all related details can be a stressful juggling act. Your priorities coupled with how quickly new listings sell will determine how you prioritize your home search. Consider how well you make major decisions when under stress.
  • When the goal is to enroll children at the start of school year or to arrive at a new job on time, back calculating with your real estate professional will reveal when the search should begin. When in doubt, start sooner, so you don’t end up faced with time-pressured decisions.
  • Hot real estate markets are the hardest to plan timing in. You may be eager to purchase, but lose out on property after property in multiple offers. Decide what your worst-case scenario would be and act accordingly.
  • Waiting for your local real estate market to change gears so prices drop is risky. Timing the real estate market is no easier than timing the stock market. The best advantage in any market lies in selecting ighly-knowledgeable, experienced professionals fully committed to working with your best interests as their top priority.
  • You may not be 100% certain this is the Spring for you to plunge into the market, but if you’re more sure than not sure, invest time finding the right professionals. If the timing is not right for you, that will become evident and you’ll discover what your options are and why.

Real estate professionals, committed to understanding market pace in areas they work, can help you manage timing. One thing they may suggest, is not to wait for the Spring Market, but to get ahead of the mass of spring buyers and jump into real estate now. For instance, sellers who are listed now are serious about selling and, depending how long their property has been on the market, they may be more receptive to negotiation.

Whether you decide to wait until Spring or jump in now, here are Five Savvy Buying Tips that ensure you’ll get the best property for your needs, at the best price, with the minimum amount of hassle and disappointment:

#1. Apply Smart Buying Rules: If you consider yourself a smart buyer when purchasing a car, a phone, or travel, apply that savvy to buying real estate. Understand what you need and why. Set a realistic budget. Learn how things work. With all these issues, the right professional should save you time, stress, and money.

#2. Ensure Location Overrules Features & Decor: Real estate is an immoveable object. That reality dictates that where you buy is the prime value concern. Smart buyers look for the least property in the best area, so their real estate improvements result in increased market value. Values within a neighborhood or community are not uniform. There are specific streets, even ends of streets, that represent the highest local value just as boundary streets and other locations may represent lower prices. Particularly in urban areas, proximity to the most highly-regarded schools, popular shopping areas, and sought-after local features like parks dictates price, as your real estate professional will explain.

#3. Maximize Move-In Timing: The more flexible your move-in date, the more room to negotiate with sellers. Agree to their ideal move date and that may generate concessions in price or inclusions. When you have a fixed move-in date, you may find yourself paying more to buy what you want, when you want it. Timing is a significant consideration when deciding whether to buy your next home before you have sold your current property, that is, taking the risk of paying on two mortgages at once. Since the market where you are selling may be different from that where you want to buy, timing decisions should involve the experience of a real estate professional or two.

#4. Own The Money Factor: Affordability encompasses costs ranging from purchase price (including legal fees and other costs), mortgage financing, and the cost of customizing the living space to including ongoing expenses like heating, cooling, commuting, and anything else that matters. With mortgage rates on the rise, reducing consumer (car) loans and credit card debt may open up borrowing room.Mortgage professionals can help you shop a wider range of lenders. These money experts can also explain why there is so much more to consider than just interest rate.

#5. Face Reality Head On: Compromises to your “must have” list can maximize value and returns.

  • You may want four bedrooms, but if two younger children share a large room until the eldest child goes to college, maybe that 3-bedroom with significantly-better location and greater appreciation potential will really work for your family.
  • If cosmetic or minor renovations don’t daunt you, this could also provide a location advantage and may even mean a larger home is affordable.
  • Compromising on location can also mean more living space, just be sure that commuting costs, including needing an extra car and possible lower appreciation rates, don’t swallow up that saving.
  • Your buying perspective is also an important consideration. Do you expect to stay until a second child appears or until all the kids finish school or are you in for the long haul? Shopping for a “forever home” is a popular approach. Just take care that projections are fact based and not fantasy that leaves you buying more home than you can comfortably afford in a rising interest-rate world.

Most people have more real estate choices than they realize. Are you sure you want to wait for Spring to get started?

Source: realtytimes.com  ~ By: PJ Wade