Jump Start Your Organizing And Simplify Your Next Move

When you’re selling your home, getting your belongings organized can seem like a low priority. You’re dealing with finding the right real estate agent, the best time to list your home on the market, and maybe even house-hunting for a new place to live.

All of that can keep you quite busy considering many of us have to do those things while we work a full-time job. Organizing your home so that you can simplify your move just doesn’t seem practical.

However, there is one main reason why getting organized can not only simplify your next move but also help improve your chances of selling your home faster and for more money.

When you go through the process of getting organized, you should be eliminating items from your home which helps to clear clutter. Clearing clutter is one of the first things agents and experts who stage homes for sale will tell you to do.

When the clutter is gone, the home can be shown much easier. Potential buyers can see what makes your house so special and different from others in the neighborhood.

If you’re putting off the process of getting organized because you think you should wait until you accept an offer, let me encourage you to get motivated to do it sooner. I’ve seen it happen many times. The homeowner thinks there’s plenty of time and then when an offer is accepted they’re thrust into high gear because the buyer wants to close escrow fast.

Of course, your agent can negotiate the closing date but sometimes a faster closing is a must. Yes, you may be able to rent back from the new owners to give you more time to prepare to move but you can’t avoid the fact that you’ll need to move at some point.

Here are five tips that can help you jump start your organizing and simplify your next move. You will be glad you start before you get an offer to purchase your home.

1. Sort piles of belongings into groups: keep, giveaway, maybe, and trash. The “maybe” pile you box up and seal for six to 12 months. If you don’t have a use for your items in the “maybe” box during the year then perhaps you can donate it.

2. Give yourself plenty of time. Be patient this process of getting organized takes time. Know that when it comes to sorting through personal papers and memorabilia it will take you much longer than reviewing other items. Leave some extra time for the expected reminiscing that will occur.

3. Store your items in clear plastic bins. Using clear boxes helps to let you have a quick view of what’s inside. If you used cardboard boxes or colored bins, then use a pen to clearly label what’s inside and which room it will go in at your new home. You might want to use a large piece of paper to write the label on so that you can reuse the bin again later for another purpose.

4. Get rid of the paper. A big problem in many homes is the paper trail they have from room to room. It could be magazines, newspapers, documents, advertisements, receipts, you name it. Most homeowners keep a lot of paper which creates a lot of clutter. Go through your files and reduce the paper by shredding or recycling documents you don’t need. You’ll find that a lot of what you’re hanging on to, you just don’t need.

5. Do it now! This is the most valuable tip. As soon as you finish reading this, go put a time on your calendar when you will begin to get organized. Placing it on your calendar should help you block off time to get started and prevent procrastination. If you take care of things right away, you’ll find that life gets simpler. The same goes for your move. So, get organized and simplify your next move!

Source: RealtyTimes.com

Terms Every Homebuyer Should Understand

If you’re buying a home, you’ll more than likely be obtaining a mortgage, which you may not know much about. In fact, unless you’ve been involved in a home sale before, there are many things you will be learning about for the first time.

Here is a handy list of some of the key terms that every person involved in a real estate transaction should understand.

Appraisal: The written analysis of the estimated value of a property, as prepared by a qualified appraiser, which often determines if you will qualify for the loan.

Closing: One of the last steps of any sale. This is the meeting where the lender, buyer and seller complete the sale and mortgage process. Once the home closes, the home officially belongs to the new buyer.

Closing costs: This term refers to the money paid at closing to the lender and consists of a loan origination fee, points, appraisal fee, title search and insurance, survey, taxes, deed recording fee, credit report charge and other costs assessed at settlement. Closing costs usually average between 2 – 6 percent of the total mortgage amount.

Credit report: Simply a report of your credit history that a lender will use to determine if you are a good risk for a loan.

Interest-only mortgage: A loan whereby you only pay the interest portion of the mortgage payment each month.

Interest rate: The annual interest on a loan. The lower your interest rate, the lower your monthly payment will be.

Lock-in: The lender’s guarantee that you will be granted a certain interest rate for a specific time period, such as 30 days before closing.

Origination fee: The fee charged by a lender for processing a loan.

Points: The amount that can be paid to a lender to lower the interest rate on your loan at closing. Each point is equal to 1 percent of the loan amount.

Private mortgage insurance (PMI): For those buyers who put less than 20 percent down on a home, lenders will require you to take out PMI, which is then added to your monthly mortgage payment. This protects the lender in the event that you default on the loan.

Title: The home document that proves ownership of the property.

Source: rismedia.com

Get Ready to Buy This Spring

Once you decide that this Spring you want to buy a new home — or your first house — the question is, “Where do we start?”

The answer lies in two sets of decisions:

#1. Start With Success: Begin by deciding what success means to you. Clarify what you really want and why, not just what’s “in” right now. Explore this practical side before viewing properties. What matters is not the number of homes you see, but zeroing in on genuine good matches. For instance, a couple who wanted to add a mortgage-paying basement suite to their next home, decided to search for houses with an existing basement bathroom since this would be the most expensive part of creating a rental unit.

#2. Who’s “We”?: The other essential to a good start is to decide who “we” is going to be:

  • Will friends or family come along to share their construction or real estate ownership expertise?
  • Will you have a contractor on-call to provide renovation-cost estimates to back up your offer price?
  • Who will you select as your local real estate professional to be sure you see all the best matches without being dragged through definite “nos.” For instance, a condominium specialist may not be the best match if you are intent on a detached house with rental suite potential. How much do you need to learn about real estate before you will be comfortable when it’s time to sign on the dotted line? If you have a steep learning curve, you’ll benefit from a real estate profession who is well equipped to inform as well as provide access to the best-fit real estate. Then there’s the professional negotiation skills you’ll want to tap into.

If you want to buy this Spring, when should you start?: How quickly you can find a home to buy and move into it depends on many factors:

  • The transition from searching for an ideal property to moving in can be condensed into a few weeks. This is often the pace for corporate relocation. Frenzied decision-making may not generate the best long-term results unless you are ultra-prepared and an experienced real estate buyer.
  • At the other extreme, stretching the search for that “perfect forever home” over many seasons or even years may work for those who want a specific location or type of property and are not displeased enough with their current home to accelerate the process.

Somewhere in between those extremes lies your ideal time line:

  • Buying within a market cycle, enables your real estate professional to identify specific properties that present the best return in that buyers’, sellers’, or flat market.
  • If you have a busy work and personal life, carving out time to consider listings, view properties, explore neighborhoods, investigate financing, and deal with all related details can be a stressful juggling act. Your priorities coupled with how quickly new listings sell will determine how you prioritize your home search. Consider how well you make major decisions when under stress.
  • When the goal is to enroll children at the start of school year or to arrive at a new job on time, back calculating with your real estate professional will reveal when the search should begin. When in doubt, start sooner, so you don’t end up faced with time-pressured decisions.
  • Hot real estate markets are the hardest to plan timing in. You may be eager to purchase, but lose out on property after property in multiple offers. Decide what your worst-case scenario would be and act accordingly.
  • Waiting for your local real estate market to change gears so prices drop is risky. Timing the real estate market is no easier than timing the stock market. The best advantage in any market lies in selecting ighly-knowledgeable, experienced professionals fully committed to working with your best interests as their top priority.
  • You may not be 100% certain this is the Spring for you to plunge into the market, but if you’re more sure than not sure, invest time finding the right professionals. If the timing is not right for you, that will become evident and you’ll discover what your options are and why.

Real estate professionals, committed to understanding market pace in areas they work, can help you manage timing. One thing they may suggest, is not to wait for the Spring Market, but to get ahead of the mass of spring buyers and jump into real estate now. For instance, sellers who are listed now are serious about selling and, depending how long their property has been on the market, they may be more receptive to negotiation.

Whether you decide to wait until Spring or jump in now, here are Five Savvy Buying Tips that ensure you’ll get the best property for your needs, at the best price, with the minimum amount of hassle and disappointment:

#1. Apply Smart Buying Rules: If you consider yourself a smart buyer when purchasing a car, a phone, or travel, apply that savvy to buying real estate. Understand what you need and why. Set a realistic budget. Learn how things work. With all these issues, the right professional should save you time, stress, and money.

#2. Ensure Location Overrules Features & Decor: Real estate is an immoveable object. That reality dictates that where you buy is the prime value concern. Smart buyers look for the least property in the best area, so their real estate improvements result in increased market value. Values within a neighborhood or community are not uniform. There are specific streets, even ends of streets, that represent the highest local value just as boundary streets and other locations may represent lower prices. Particularly in urban areas, proximity to the most highly-regarded schools, popular shopping areas, and sought-after local features like parks dictates price, as your real estate professional will explain.

#3. Maximize Move-In Timing: The more flexible your move-in date, the more room to negotiate with sellers. Agree to their ideal move date and that may generate concessions in price or inclusions. When you have a fixed move-in date, you may find yourself paying more to buy what you want, when you want it. Timing is a significant consideration when deciding whether to buy your next home before you have sold your current property, that is, taking the risk of paying on two mortgages at once. Since the market where you are selling may be different from that where you want to buy, timing decisions should involve the experience of a real estate professional or two.

#4. Own The Money Factor: Affordability encompasses costs ranging from purchase price (including legal fees and other costs), mortgage financing, and the cost of customizing the living space to including ongoing expenses like heating, cooling, commuting, and anything else that matters. With mortgage rates on the rise, reducing consumer (car) loans and credit card debt may open up borrowing room.Mortgage professionals can help you shop a wider range of lenders. These money experts can also explain why there is so much more to consider than just interest rate.

#5. Face Reality Head On: Compromises to your “must have” list can maximize value and returns.

  • You may want four bedrooms, but if two younger children share a large room until the eldest child goes to college, maybe that 3-bedroom with significantly-better location and greater appreciation potential will really work for your family.
  • If cosmetic or minor renovations don’t daunt you, this could also provide a location advantage and may even mean a larger home is affordable.
  • Compromising on location can also mean more living space, just be sure that commuting costs, including needing an extra car and possible lower appreciation rates, don’t swallow up that saving.
  • Your buying perspective is also an important consideration. Do you expect to stay until a second child appears or until all the kids finish school or are you in for the long haul? Shopping for a “forever home” is a popular approach. Just take care that projections are fact based and not fantasy that leaves you buying more home than you can comfortably afford in a rising interest-rate world.

Most people have more real estate choices than they realize. Are you sure you want to wait for Spring to get started?

Source: realtytimes.com  ~ By: PJ Wade

7 Factors to Consider When Searching for the Perfect Neighborhood

Good restaurants aren’t the only amenities worth looking for in a neighborhood.

You can remodel a home, but there are some things about a neighborhood you can’t change. And many neighborhood factors can add value to your home. Here are some of the best features to look for:

Nearby Services
If restaurants, a grocery store, post office, bank and other retail services are within walking distance of your home, chances are you’ll use them more often. A short drive to them isn’t so bad either, but walking or biking out to lunch can make a home much more marketable. Police and fire services should also be nearby.

Walkability
A walkable neighborhood helps your health, the environment, finances and the community. The average resident of a walkable neighborhood weighs 6 – 10 pounds less than someone who lives in a sprawling neighborhood, according to Walk Score—an app that measures walkability.

Not driving a car lowers a household’s expenses, and for every 10 minutes a person spends in a daily car commute, they spend 10 percent less time in community activities, Walk Score says.

A truly walkable neighborhood can have a town center or public space nearby with enough people for businesses to flourish and public transit to run frequently. It may have affordable housing located near businesses, plenty of public parks, buildings close to the street and parking lots in the back to encourage pedestrians. It might also be close to schools and workplaces so people can walk from home. Lastly, its streets may be designed for bicyclists, pedestrians and transit.

Dog Parks
Parks and green space are beneficial to everyone, but dog owners specifically need parks and walking trails to exercise their pets. Look for a clean dog park within walking distance of the home you want to buy. See if the dogs are well trained and get along, which can make going to the dog park more enjoyable.

Planned Improvements
Check with the city’s Planning Department to see what improvements are planned for the neighborhood and when they’re scheduled to be completed. Is a four-story apartment complex planned for an empty lot near your home? Will streets be widened? Are certain retailers coming soon?

Mature Trees
Trees can cut a home’s cooling bill in half in the summer and can block wind in the winter to reduce heating by 20 – 50 percent. A healthy, mature tree can add $1,000 – $10,000 to the value of a home, according to the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers. Large, healthy trees can be worth preserving and can add to the aesthetics of a neighborhood.

Source: rismedia.com

Don’t Wait: Buying Will Cost More in Just One Year

Are you on the fence about owning a home? It may be better to buy now than wait.

The nation’s median home value is expected to grow by $6,275 to $208,975 just one year from today, according to Zillow, adding on to the already considerable funds homebuyers need now to own a home. The average homebuyer, in fact, has to add $105 more each month to their down payment savings (assuming a 20 percent down payment on a median-priced home) over the next year, or $1,260 total, to keep up with the rise in values.

In other words: It costs more to hold off.

“Sky-high rents and rising home prices are putting first-time buyers in a bit of a catch-22,” says Dr. Svenja Gudell, chief economist at Zillow. “Buying now with a low down payment can be riskier, and the offer may not be considered as competitive by the seller; however, a renter who saves for another year to reach a larger down payment may find that the home they love today is outside their budget a year from now. For those considering buying in the next year, getting into the market today may make more financial sense than they think.”

Homebuyers in hotter markets have to contribute even more to their savings if they wait. In San Jose, Calif., the average homebuyer has to add $599 more each month to their savings to purchase a median-priced home ($1,088,434) with 20 percent down ($1,088,434); in Seattle, Wash., the average homebuyer has to add $394 more each month to their savings to purchase a median-priced home ($479,451) with 20 percent down.

In other markets:

San Diego, Calif.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $267
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $569,906

Riverside, Calif.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $266
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $348,949

Sacramento, Calif.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $246
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $388,336

Las Vegas, Nev.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $229
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $247,331

Portland, Ore.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $227
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $383,348

Boston, Mass.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $206
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $443,047

San Francisco, Calif.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $192
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $876,938

Denver, Colo.
Additional Down Payment Savings Per Month: $181
Expected Median Home Value (Sept. 2018): $383,667

Source: rismedia.com ~ By: Suzanne De Vita

Who Owns the Home When Two Names are on the Mortgage?

We shed some light on buying a home as a couple so you’re not in the dark when it’s time to sign on the dotted lines.

When couples start a new journey as homeowners, questions can linger as to whose name (or names) should be listed on the mortgage and title. Many couples want a 50/50 split, indicating equal ownership to the asset, but sometimes that isn’t the best financial decision. Plus, with more than one person on the loan, the legalities of who owns the home can get tricky. A home is often the largest purchase a couple or an individual will make in their lifetime, so ownership can have big financial implications for the future.

Title vs. mortgage

For starters, it’s important to note the difference between a mortgage and a title. A property title and a mortgage are not interchangeable terms.

In short, a mortgage is an agreement to pay back the loan amount borrowed to buy a home. A title refers to the rights of ownership to the property. Many people assume that as a couple, both names are listed on both documents as 50/50 owners, but they don’t have to be. Listing both names might not make the most sense for you.

Making sense of mortgages

For many, mortgages are a staple of homeownership. According to the Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report 2017, more than three-quarters (76 percent) of American households who bought a home last year obtained a mortgage to do so.

When a couple applies jointly for a mortgage, lenders don’t use an average of both borrowers’ FICO scores. Instead, each borrower has three FICO scores from the three credit-reporting agencies, and lenders review those scores to acquire the mid-value for each borrower. Then, lenders use the lower score for the joint loan application. This is perhaps the biggest downside of a joint mortgage if you have stronger credit than your co-borrower.

So, if you or your partner has poor credit, consider applying alone to keep that low score from driving your interest rate up. However, a single income could cause you to qualify for a lower amount on the loan.

Before committing to co-borrowing, think about doing some scenario evaluation with a lender to figure out which would make more financial sense for you and your family.

True ownership

If you decide only one name on the mortgage makes the most sense, but you’re concerned about your share of ownership of the home, don’t worry. Both names can be on the title of the home without being on the mortgage. Generally, it’s best to add a spouse or partner to the title of the home at the time of closing if you want to avoid extra steps and potential hassle. Your lender could refuse to allow you to add another person — many mortgages have a clause requiring a mortgage to be paid in full if you want to make changes. On the bright side, some lenders may waive it to add a family member.

In the event you opt for two names on the title and only one on the mortgage, both of you are owners.

The person who signed the mortgage, however, is the one obligated to pay off the loan. If you’re not on the mortgage, you aren’t held responsible by the lending institution for ensuring the loan is paid.

Not on mortgage or title

Not being on either the mortgage or the title can put you in quite the predicament regarding homeownership rights. Legally, you have no ownership of the home if you aren’t listed on the title. If things go sour with the relationship, you have no rights to the home or any equity.

To be safe, the general rule of home ownership comes down to whose names are listed on the title of the home, not the mortgage.

Source: zillow.com ~ BY BRITTAN JENKINS

7 Best Things About Buying A House In The Fall

The summertime real estate season is as hot as the weather, but you might want to postpone your purchase until fall.

For the first time in recent history, October surpassed June as the most popular month to get married. And these autumn-loving brides may be on to something: Although the spring months are notoriously the best time to buy real estate (as well as have a wedding), fall may be the new ideal season to buy a home.

Hear us out: One obvious reason is that it’s easier to get from open house to open house without questioning if you’ll need an AC repair ASAP upon moving into that home for sale in Phoenix, AZ. Also, families on a mission to move into a new home before school starts are out of the picture. Besides these two more obvious reasons, here are seven expert insights on why you should consider a fall real estate purchase.

1. There’s less competition

Competition for houses drops off in the fall, a time many people consider to be off-season in real estate. But there are still homes for sale — and in some cases, there’s just as much inventory as there was during the spring and summer. “[Fall] means new inventory and repositioned old inventory that did not sell in the prime season,” says Wesley Stanton, a New York, NY, agent with The Stanton Hoch Team.

This puts you in a great position to negotiate. “Fall homebuyers should consider [making] lowball offers, followed by more aggressive negotiation,” says Brian Davis, a real estate investor and director of education at Spark Rental. Davis points out that many sellers are very motivated to sell before the holidays. If possible, buyers should let these sellers know that they can close before Thanksgiving or before the school winter break.

2. Sellers are worn-out

Some sellers who put their homes on the market during the prime selling times of spring and summer might have been a tad overconfident by listing their homes for more than buyers were willing to spend. After months of no action, these sellers are often ready to make a deal. “Sellers who were unrealistic earlier in the year about price will now be more willing to reduce the price come fall,” says Thomas Miller, a Washington, DC, real estate agent. “Because there [are fewer buyers] and because the sellers are now eager to sell, they are more inclined to take the low offer than wait another six months for spring to come around.”

3. Sellers are serious

Not all homes on the market in fall are summer leftovers. Some people need to sell in the fall because the timing is right. Maybe they were having a home built, and it’s now ready. Maybe they need to move because of a job. “The sellers with houses on the market in the fall tend to be serious,” says Sam Heskel, president of Nadlan Valuation, an appraisal management company in Brooklyn, NY. “That means sellers could be more open to negotiating and accepting a lower offer.”

4. You can take advantage of tax breaks

First-time homebuyers, take note: Although you can’t escape paying income tax, you can make a dent in what you owe when you become a homeowner. “Property tax and mortgage interest are both deductions you can take for your whole year’s worth of income, even if you closed on your home in December,” says David Hryck, a New York, NY tax adviser, lawyer, and personal finance expert. “Any payments that are made prior to the closing of the loan are tax-deductible. This can make a serious difference in the amount you owe the government at the end of the year.”

5. Fall is a safer time of year

Did you know that burglars have peak seasons? They do, says Sarah Brown, a home safety expert for SafeWise.com. “July and August are prime months for burglaries to take place,” she says. “Waiting until the fall [to buy] gives you an advantage when learning about a home and the neighborhood.” You’ll be settled in your home and can take precautions — like setting up that new alarm system — before the next burglary season rolls around. Note: Check Trulia’s local maps with the crime filter before you buy.

6. You’re the center of attention

Because spring and summer are ideal times to buy a home, real estate agents are usually busier then. And that could mean you might not always get the attention you want. This is also true for other professionals you’re working with to buy a house. “Service providers, such as mortgage lenders and title companies, are moving out of the summertime sales swamp and can often respond more quickly,” says John Lazenby, president of the Orlando Regional Realtor Association in Orlando, FL.

The same goes for movers. “Because summer is peak moving season, people often experience more delays and service issues, such as moving companies reaching capacity and running out of trucks to pick up shipments,” says Jack Griffin, president and chief operating officer of Atlas World Group. “The probability of experiencing a delay goes way down in the fall season.”

7. You can take advantage of end-of-year sales to outfit your home

There are bound to be improvements you’ll want to make after buying a house. You’ll also probably need to buy items to maintain your home, and if appliances weren’t part of the deal, you’ll need those too. Wouldn’t it be great to coordinate your home purchase with sales on items you’ll need? According to Consumer Reports, the calendar determines when it’s a good time to buy all sorts of consumer goods. In particular, September is a great time for buying carpet and paint. October means lawn mowers go on sale, and appliances and cookware are cheaper in November.

Source: trulia.comBy Laura Agadoni

Solutions To Saving Money On Your Next Move

Buying a house and moving in is gonna cost you. There’s no way around it. Right? Well, actually, there may just be a way to make it not quite so painful. A willingness to negotiate and put in a little work plus a little inside info on special deals you can take advantage of can help you cut some costs. Here are eight ways to save money on your move and move in.

1. Don’t take it all with you

Furniture you’re no longer in love with or appliances like washers and dryers or the fridge you have in the garage can be a pain to move. You can potentially save money (and time and hassle) by including them in your home sale. First-time buyers or someone moving from out of state may appreciate your old stuff far more than you, and you don’t have to pay to haul it to your next place.

NOTE: You can also haul furniture and appliance out to the street and call a non-profit to come pick them up.

2. Leave the flat screen

If you have a mounted flat screen TV that’s at least a few years old, consider leaving it behind too. The cost of taking it down and repairing the wall behind it plus the care involved in moving it might not be worth it. Flat-screen technology is always improving while costs are coming down, so it’s a good excuse to buy something bigger and better without spending a lot.

3. Negotiate everything

If you’ve been looking for a house or have bought one before, you’re probably already aware of closing costs. But you might not be aware of how much you can negotiate with your lender.

“Shop around before choosing a mortgage lender, but don’t stop there,” said Bankrate. “When you receive your good faith estimate of closing costs, or GFE, the negotiation hasn’t ended.” This itemized list of estimated closing costs includes lender’s fees as well as items such as appraisal charges and title insurance premiums.

“The lender or broker charges some fees, and third parties charge others. The first step is to find out which are loan origination fees and which are third-party fees. Don’t guess. Ask the lender or broker.”

Bankrate advises that while “some items are non-negotiable: taxes, city and county stamps, recording fees, prorated interest and reserves,” negotiating on others that can “be waived or reduced” can save you money.”

4. Barter for services

Need a handyman and have appliances or furniture you’re getting rid of? You just might be able to make a deal. Ask around for referrals and then introduce a barter system into the equation during your first conversation. You might be surprised what you can get for what you’ve already got.

5. Move Smart

Once you’re out of college, or maybe out of your first post-college apartment, thinking about renting a U-Haul and moving yourself (or with a few good friends) seems less than desirable. But if you’re willing to sweat a little (ok, a lot) you can save a bundle. Just remember two important things to entice and thank your friends: Pizza. And beer.

If you don’t want to do the whole thing on your own, think of ways you can save by doing a hybrid move:

  • Do the packing and unpacking yourself
  • Have everything on one floor. Stairs can add considerably to the cost of a move.
  • Pare down. Maybe you don’t need to bring all that stuff with you. Selling it will earn you a few bucks and save you a few more.

6. Consider moving and storage hybrid options

A company like PODS or U-Pack might be a solution for you if you need self storage wrapped into your move. Essentially, the company drops off a mobile storage unit at your house and you pack it up yourself. They then pick it up and move it for you. You can tack on storage at the end if needed, making this a particularly good solution for those who have time between their move out and their move in. This type of move can cost up to 35 percent less than traditional movers, but keep in mind you will be doing the labor – just not the driving.

7. Take advantage of special offers

Move-in offers for cable, Internet, and phone service can save you a lot of money. But they often come with a catch that could cost you down the line. Look out for special limited-time offers – one-year or six-month specials that expire, leaving you with much higher rates after the introductory period.

8. Don’t rush the renos

Chances are, after you move in, you’re going to start receiving all kinds of junk mail asking if you want to refi, redo your lawn, and apply for 72 different credit cards. In what seems like an endless pile of junk mail will be some special offers for new homebuyers, but they might not arrive for a month or more. Look out for coupons from handymen, companies selling flooring and window coverings, home furnishing companies like Bed Bath and Beyond and World Market, and offers from landscapers with discounts for new clients. If you’re planning to shop, renovate, or do some work on your interior or exterior, taking advantage of a few of these offers can help shave down the cost.

Source: realtytimes.com ~ By: JAYMI NACIRI